SDG 5
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Ending all forms of discrimination against women and girls is not only a basic human right, but it also crucial to accelerating sustainable development. It has been proven time and again, that empowering women and girls has a multiplier effect, and helps drive up economic growth and development across the board.

Since 2000, UNDP, together with our UN partners and the rest of the global community, has made gender equality central to our work. We have seen remarkable progress since then. More girls are now in school compared to 15 years ago, and most regions have reached gender parity in primary education. Women now make up to 41 percent of paid workers outside of agriculture, compared to 35 percent in 1990.

The SDGs aim to build on these achievements to ensure that there is an end to discrimination against women and girls everywhere. There are still huge inequalities in the labour market in some regions, with women systematically denied equal access to jobs. Sexual violence and exploitation, the unequal division of unpaid care and domestic work, and discrimination in public office, all remain huge barriers.

Affording women equal rights to economic resources such as land and property are vital targets to realizing this goal. So is ensuring universal access to sexual and reproductive health. Today there are more women in public office than ever before, but encouraging women leaders will help strengthen policies and legislation for greater gender equality.   

Goals in action

UNDP in India

Snapshot: UNDP in 2016

A quick recap of UNDP in 2016 in India. From rural housing, to skilling, Ganga rejuvenation, biodiversity conservation, governance and support to implementation of government schemes. Its been an exciting year. Take a look! MORE >

UNDP in Philippines

Women and the sustainable management of nature at the local level in the Philippines

In the workshop, local conservation practitioners, such as Raquel and Donna, were trained on how to sustainably manage NLNP. Part of their work was to develop conservation and income-generating programs for their respective municipalities, which is part of Biodiversity Finance Initiative’s (BIOFIN) localization activities. MORE >

UNDP in Afghanistan

After Half a Life of Working in UNDP, Farida has Seen a lot, Learned a lot and Helped a lot of People

Farida Alam is UNDP Afghanistan’s longest-serving member of staff. She’s been with us for 25 years – a period in which Afghanistan and UNDP have seen astonishing changes. MORE >

UNDP in Timor-Leste

Capacity building of civilian officers in the Timor-Leste National Police

UNDP has promoted the use of civilian officers in the Timor-Leste National Police to sustain skills and knowledge in key technical and administrative areas. UNDP Promove ona usa ofisiais sivil iha Polisia Nasional Timor Leste hodi alkansa abilidade no koñesimentho iha funsaun teknichal no area administrativu MORE >

UNDP in Afghanistan

Out of Exile: Women Return to Afghanistan to Start New Lives and Businesses with Help from UNDP

4 January 2017, Mazar-e-Sharif — Gulsoom Kohistani was born in Iran and in her early teens when her family decided to return to Afghanistan after two decades of exile. Along with hundreds of other families, Gulsoom’s family settled in Aliabad – a township 20 kilometers northeast of Balkh’s Mazar-e-Sharif. MORE >

UNDP in India

DISHA in Action: Stories of Aspiration, Stories of Direction

At a Career Guidance and Counselling Centre set up with SEWA Bharat under the Disha project, Deepika discovered that even as a class 10th graduate, she could enrol in a hotel management course. Now, Deepika is pursuing her dream of becoming a chef. Over the last year, 10,000 young girls like Deepika have benefitted from such services. MORE >

UNDP in Afghanistan

Playing to Win

Muzhgan Sadaat, 23, is a soft-spoken young woman who comes across as happy-go-lucky. But when it comes to following her passion, she won’t surrender to anybody. Muzhgan was ten when she started to play volleyball, but as she grew older, her father thought it wasn’t appropriate for her to continue. “He said our relatives didn’t like it,” recalls Muzhgan. “They believed it was shameful for a girl to play sports.” MORE >

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